Tuesday, 24 April 2018

Tomato Omelette

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON -APRIL 2018

#87TH BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 20

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   Do any of you have days when you just can't get any good ideas for food styling? Do you look at the photos after a few days and think 'what sort of picture have I taken?' Or sometimes are you so pressed for time that you take pictures in a hurry and then later on realize they are so bad but now the food has gone down everyones tummy? That recently happened to me and now when I look at the picture, its so so bad. I have two options, either just use that picture or make the dish again and take a better picture before its time to post the recipe. 
   
   Anyway, I think we all have our days. In this competitive world we have to compete with excellent styled food pictures against good recipes. There have been times when I've tried out a recipe from other sites and blogs and they have been disasters but the pictures are what we all call drool worthy! 
Oh well, styling food is part practice and part artistic talent. Food styling comes so easily to my daughter. Her other pictures too are good. She has an eye for it. 

Check out her website : Dubae

   We're already into Day 20 and today's breakfast is a Tomato Omelette from ARMENIA. This is not the usual omelette where one adds chopped tomatoes to the egg. Its different and tastes good and is a hearty meal. Sometimes along with the tomatoes some minced meat is added. Its easy to make and I added my own homemade tomato sauce and coriander to it as I didn't have fresh basil. This preparation is a bit like shakshuka but the difference is that instead of adding whole egg to the stir fried vegetables, here the eggs are first whisked and then added.







TOMATO OMELETTE 
Serves 2

1 onion, diced or sliced
1-2  tomatoes, diced
½ cup homemade thick tomato sauce
3-4 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
½ cup sweet bell pepper, diced
4 eggs
½ - ¾ tsp salt
1tsp pepper powder
2 tbsp fresh coriander, chopped
1 tbsp olive oil
  1. Heat oil in a wide pan over medium heat.
  2. Add chopped onion and stir fry till a bit soft.
  3. Add the chopped garlic, tomatoes and sweet bell pepper.
  4. Stri fry till the peppers are soft.
  5. Add salt and the homemade tomato sauce.
  6. Cook the mixture till all the water from the sauce evaporates.
  7. In the meantime whisk the eggs in a jug.
  8. Pour the whisked eggs over the tomato sauce.
  9. Cover the pan with a lid and let the egg cook till done.
  10. Sprinkle pepper powder and chopped coriander over the omelette.
  11. Serve with bread and butter.
Tips:
  • To make homemade tomato sauce or puree, dip the tomatoes in hot water. Leave for a few minutes. Peel off the skin. Puree the tomatoes. At this point you can leave it as it is or make it into a pizza like sauce with onions, garlic and seasoning.
  • For a firm omelette cook for a long time and for a soft omelette, cook for less time.

A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia
M - Masoub - Saudi Arabia
N - Nasi Goreng - Indonesia
O - Oladushki - Russia
P - Pandesal - The Philippines
Q - Qistibi - Tatarstan and Bashkortostan
R - Red Rice Porridge - Bhutan
S - Suafa'i - Samoa

Check out what other Mega Blogging Marathoners have made for Day 20:

  
   

  
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Monday, 23 April 2018

Suafa'i - Banana Soup

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018

#87 BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME:EXPLORE THE FLAVORS - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 19

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   When Srivalli first suggested the themes for this Mega Blogging Marathon my mind was set on the breakfast theme. Little did I know that I would truly be exploring flavors from other countries and some from countries I'd not heard of like Tatarstan. At that time the only breakfast dishes that I could see were French Toast, different bakes, oatmeals, you know the usual Sunday brunch items.  When I decided to take on the challenge of making breakfast dishes from A-Z, that's when a whole world of different breakfast dishes opened up.

   Today's breakfast is one such dish. Never heard of it before I started the research. Though it didn't seem too appetizing to boil a ripe banana in water, I still had to try it. Isn't that what the theme is all about exploring flavors that we're not use to or haven't had before? I must say after I prepared this particular breakfast dish I was surprised how tasty it was. Did I mention healthy too? Yes healthy and filling and a very different kind of breakfast.

   Breakfast with letter S is Suafa'i from SAMOA. Staple products in Samoa are coconut, banana and cocoa. So its not surprising that they have a fruit soup which is commonly served for breakfast. Suafa'i is a banana soup and supoesi is a papaya soup. I initially wanted to make the papaya soup but didn't get a nice sweet papaya. 

   Here's the recipe for Suafa'i which is commonly served for breakfast in Samoa and can also be enjoyed as a dessert. 






SUAFA'I- BANANA FRUIT SOUP 
Serves 2

2 ripe bananas
1 cup water
2-3 tbsp tapioca pearls (sabudana)
¼ - ⅓ cup coconut milk
1-2 tsp sugar -optional


  1. Soak the tapioca pearls in water for 30 minutes.
  2. Slice the bananas and add to a pan. Add the water.
  3. Put the pan on medium heat.
  4. Let the banana cook in the water till it becomes soft.
  5. Mash the cooked banana lightly with a masher or a fork.
  6. Add the tapioca pearls and let the mixture simmer till the tapioca pearls are cooked. They should become transparent. Remember to stir the mixture occasionally so that the tapioca pearls do not stick to the bottom of the pan.
  7. When the tapioca is done, add coconut milk. 
  8. Let the mixture become hot and serve immediately.
  9. This soup can also be served cold. 
Tips:
  • The recipe I followed does not recommend soaking the tapioca pearls but I did as they cook much faster.
  • Adding sugar is optional. The bananas were sweet enough so I didn't add any.
  • Use extra ripe bananas as thy tend to be sweet.You wouldn't need to add sugar.
  • The recipe for papaya soup is similar. You add 1 cup of chopped papaya and make it just the way you make saufa'i.
  • Personally I prefer the cold version. The taste is like sabudana kheer but with mashed banana in it.

A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia
M - Masoub - Saudi Arabia
N - Nasi Goreng - Indonesia
O - Oladushki - Russia
P - Pandesal - The Philippines
Q - Qistibi - Tatarstan and Bashkortostan
R - Red Rice Porridge - Bhutan

Check out what other Mega Blogging Marathoners have made for Day 19:
 
   


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Chilled Cucumber and Yogurt Soup

Where are the RAINS?

   Today my brain is all foggy and I can barely keep my eyes open. Last night was an uncomfortable hot night. The AC was on but I still felt hot. Its probably around 4a.m. that I fell asleep and got up at 8  a.m.! That meant it was like a mad rush getting lunch ready, getting the washing machine started and all the usual chores before 10a.m. when the water disappears from the taps. I didn't manage to beat the clock, some chores are left and will have to tackle them after 4 when the water returns. 

   Many parts of Kenya have rainfall to the extend that floods are closing down roads, bridges and some places are impossible to get to. However, Mombasa is a different story altogether. Its still hot and whenever it does drizzle the weather becomes more humid and hot. Considering that on hot days I just don't want to have curries, dals and rotis, I decided to make something cold for our FoodieMonday/Bloghop Monday theme. #141 theme is YogurtBased suggested by Amrita who blogs at The Food Samaritan. Check out Amrita's blog for beautiful clicks, lovely food styling and of course scrumptious food recipes.

   Cucumber and Yogurt are both very cooling and good to have during the hot season. Hubby was still hungry after sipping all the soup but I was a happy content person for an hour or so. On a serious note whether you want to consider this preparation as a savory smoothie, chilled soup or even a raita, its up to you. Whatever you call it, it was definitely a healthy and filling. 

Here's the recipe for a super cooling and tasty chilled cucumber and yogurt soup.





CHILLED CUCUMBER AND YOGURT SOUP
For 2

1 English cucumber (approx. 250g)
1 green chili
1 clove of garlic, peeled
1 cup plain greek yogurt
½ cup mint and coriander mixed
¼ cup sour cream
¼ cup chopped spring onion with both green and white part
½ tsp salt
1-2 tbsp lemon juice
¼ tsp pepper powder

To serve:
finely chopped cucumber
a drizzle of olive oil


  1. Cut a quarter piece from the cucumber and leave it on the side. Cut the rest into chunks.
  2. Chop the coriander, mint, chili and garlic.
  3. Put it all in a blender including the cucumber chunks along with salt, lemon juice, sour cream and pepper powder.
  4. Process the mixture to a smooth consistency.
  5. Put it in the fridge for 1-2 hours to chill.
  6. Chop the quarter piece of cucumber into very fine pieces.
  7. To serve, spoon the chilled soup in a bowl or tall glasses.
  8. Add the chopped cucumber on top and drizzle some olive oil over it.
  9. Serve chilled.
Tips:
  • Adjust the spices according to your taste.
  • Instead of sour cream can add some normal whipping cream. In that case increase the amount of lemon juice used.
You may want to check out other yogurt recipes:
strawberry frozen yogurt
Fruit and Nut Yogurt Parfait
Dahi Chura
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Sunday, 22 April 2018

Red Rice Porridge

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018

#87 BLOGGING MARATHON 

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 18

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   Meeting old classmates after many many years can be either exciting and you just pick up where you left or it can be a disheartening experience. I've met a few of my classmates after a long time. With a couple after catching up with what's transpired from the time we left school to the present, we remain friends but not best friends. With a few I've just chosen to not keep in touch as our opinions and lives are so different. 

   Today hubby met up with an old class mate of his after a long time. While they couldn't stop chatting away and catching up, the wives had to feel as comfortable as possible by making small talk. But what made so happy is to see how happy both were to catch up from where they left. 
Would I want to go to a class reunion? Well, yes definitely would as it would be nice to know how life has treated people you've schooled with.  What is your opinion about school or college reunions?

   Today's breakfast dish begins with R. I initially had planned the famous Roti John from Singapore/Malaysia. However, after so many egg breakfasts, I decided to make something quite different. That doesn't mean I'm over and done with eggs but for today, yes. R is for Red Rice Porridge all the way from BHUTAN. Bhutan is such a majestic and beautiful Buddhist Kingdom. Years back when hubby and I were much younger and more adventurous, we decided to got to Bhutan. Hubby had seen the scenic pictures of Bhutan in National Geographic and really wanted to visit the country. Not knowing the rules and regulations fully well, we landed up by road in the border town of Phuntsholing. We checked into a hotel and hubby went to the permit office to see if we could go further into Bhutan. Unfortunately we didn't get it and next day had to leave. Bhutan has a policy of allowing only a certain number of tourists into the country every year. Its their way pf preserving the pristine environment and controlling the 'bad' influence of the rest of the world.Maybe one day we will visit it.

  Bhutan is famous for its red rice and is the staple rice for the Bhutanese.Besides using the rice to make various dishes for lunch and dinner, they prepare a red rice porridge for breakfast. Also known as thupka(not the same as the soup), its just the right kind of hot and hearty meal you'd want, to fight off the cold mountain air. It is served either with a small pieces of meat or served on its own with some yak butter and yak cheese called chhurpi. The porridge has a lovely earthy and nutty flavor. The porridge is served along with some yak butter tea made of black tea with some butter in it.

   Make this nutty, creamy and absolutely delicious porridge for breakfast. Something different and healthy. I didn't have access to yak butter and cheese so opted to use what was locally available. I used feta cheese.







RED RICE PORRIDGE  
Serves 2

½ cup red rice
2-3 cups of water, depending on the type of red rice used
¼ tsp salt
½ tsp ginger paste or cut into thin slivers
5-6 Sichuan peppercorns, ground into a coarse powder
2 tsp butter
2 tbsp soft cheese like feta or ricotta (instead of soft yak cheese)


  1. Wash the rice in a sieve for a few seconds.
  2. Add it to a pan along with the water, ginger and salt.
  3. Cover the pan and cook the rice over medium heat till it is soft and cooked. The rice will turn from red to a pink colour.
  4. If necessary add some more water.
  5. Puree the rice a bit(not into a smooth consistency). It should be coarse.
  6. Add pepper and mix well.
  7. Spoon the porridge into serving bowls.
  8. Top it with some butter and soft cheese.
  9. Serve it piping hot with some yak butter tea.
Tips:
  • I soaked the rice in water for 30 minutes so that it would cook faster.
  • If you don't have Sichuan peppercorns, using normal black peppercorns.
  • Adding small pieces of cooked meat is an option.
  • I found the above recipe was enough for hubby and me as the preparation is filling. However, you can increase the amount of rice to make more porridge.

A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia
M - Masoub - Saudi Arabia
N - Nasi Goreng - Indonesia
O - Oladushki - Russia
P - Pandesal - The Philippines
Q - Qistibi - Tatarstan and Bashkortostan

Check out what other Mega Blogging Marathoners have made for Day 18:


   



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Saturday, 21 April 2018

Qistibi

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018
#87 BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS  - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 17

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   If you've read my yesterday's post, I had mentioned that I have to make idli sambhar for my Lions Club meeting. All went well, everyone enjoyed it. However, last night when I was grinding the rice and dal to make the batter, my blender jug broke. Literally the bottom bit crumbled into pieces, thanks to the salty water we get in our taps that over time the metal parts got rusted. I shouted to my hubby to get ready immediately so that we can make it to the only supermarket in town before it closes. 

   Hubby tried to reason with me that in my urgency to get another blender, I'll pick whatever I see first and then later regret the buy. I told him that he does not understand. He tried to convince me that he understood my predicament. Then he suggested I borrow my neighbor's blender. At first I didn't thinking what if it gets spoilt. Ever resourceful hubby said that if that happens then we'll buy two! Finally borrowed the blender from my neighbor. Tomorrow going to hunt for a good food processor.

   What would life be without neighbors? They're usually the first ones who come to your aid. During our visits to Montreal, as much as I love the parks, the weather, the cleanliness, the availability of quality goods, I tell my hubby that I miss chitchatting to my neighbors. In all these years that we've been visiting my son, we don't even know the neighbors. Its just too quiet for me. I get a chance to talk tony immediate neighbor every day. If she doesn't see me and I haven't mentioned to her that I'll be going out, she will immediately call to find out if I'm ok. 

   Day 17 the breakfast (which I served hubby for lunch) turned out to a pleasant surprise for both of us. We both love mashed potatoes and these flatbreads were perfect as lunch with a large serving of salad. I made Qistibi which is famous in Tatarstan and Bashkortostan(also known as Bashkiria) both are federal subjects (republic) of the Russian Federation. Frankly I've not heard of these republics. But hey as food bloggers not only do we learn about food and different cuisine but also about different parts of the world. While doing my research for breakfast around the world, I was looking for breads that are a part of breakfast and stumbled upon Qistibi. The name itself caught my attention. What a unique name. I did a happy dance that I've found something beginning with Q, before so many of the easier letters. 

  Qistibi is popular as a breakfast dish. The stuffing can be either mashed potatoes or a millet gruel. Its usually served with tea that is extra milky and has some dried fruit in it. I didn't make the tea as it was lunch time, but served qistibi with some sour cream. Rolling the flatbread really thin was a bit of a challenge but worth every effort. While I was making qistibi, thought hubby will say that its just a fancy name for aloo paratha. However, it tastes so different from aloo paratha as the mashed potatoes are nice and creamy and hardly any spices are used.


Check out the recipe for Qistibi and do Google Tatarstan and Bashkortostan. They both look so beautiful. It's on my the bucket list ;)















QISTIBI

Makes 6
Recipe Source: The Bread Guru

For the flatbread:
1 cup plain flour
1 tbsp butter, at room temperature
¼ tsp salt
a generous pinch of soda bicarbonate (baking soda)
¼ tsp sugar
2 tbsp plain yogurt
4 tbsp milk

For the mashed potatoes:

2 medium potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
½ tsp salt
2-3 tbsp milk
1-2 tbsp butter
1 small onion, finely chopped
½ tsp pepper powder

extra butter or oil for frying

extra flour for dusting

Preparation of the flatbread:

  1. Mix flour, salt, sugar and baking soda in a bowl.
  2. Rub the butter into the flour.
  3. Mix yogurt and milk. Add to the flour and make a dough.
  4. Take a little butter or oil in your hands and knead the dough till it becomes smooth.
  5. Cover the dough and let it rest for 20-30 minutes.
  6. Divide the dough into 6 parts. Shape them into balls.
  7. Roll each part into a flat thin circle, like a tortilla or roti but much thinner. The diameter of the rolled circle should be about 7"- 8".
  8. Cover the rolled flatbread with a tea towel so it doesn't dry out.
  9. When you've rolled all the divided dough, heat a pan over medium heat.
  10. Place the flatbread on the hot pan and cook it till bubbles appear. 
  11. Flip it over and cook for a few seconds.
  12. Remove from the pan and cover it with a tea towel.
  13. Repeat steps 10-12 with the remaining flatbreads.
Preparation of the mashed potatoes:
  1. Add the cubed potatoes in a pan with just enough water to cover the potatoes.
  2. Cover the pan and let the potato pieces boil till done.
  3. Remove the water (save it to add to soup or use it to make dough for roti or naan).
  4. While the potatoes are still a bit hot, mash them completely.
  5. Add salt, pepper, milk and butter and mix well.
  6. Heat 1 tbsp oil or butter and stir fry the chopped onions till done.
  7. Add the fried onion to the mashed potato mixture and mix well.
Preparation of Qistibi:
  1. Heat the pan again over medium heat.
  2. Divide the mashed potato mixture into 6 parts.
  3. Take one part of the mashed potato and spread it out on the flatbread to make a thin layer.
  4. Fold the flatbread into half, just like a quesadilla.
  5. Place it on the hot pan. Brush some butter on the upper side of the qistibi.
  6. Flip it over and let it cook till brown specks appear.
  7. Brush some butter on the upper side and flip. Let it cook till its light golden in color or brown specks appear.
  8. Repeat steps 3-7 with the remaining flatbread and mashed potato.
  9. Serve qistibi with some dried fruit tea. 
Tips:
  • As I made a small quantity I avoided adding egg and used yogurt instead. If you double the recipe then you can add one medium egg to the dough. You may need less milk. However, even though I didn't add the egg, the flatbread turned out soft and a little crispy.
  • To make dried fruit tea, usually equal parts of water and milk are boiled with some dried fruit of your choice. 
  • Use extra flour for dusting to help you to roll out the flatbread thin.

A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia
M - Masoub - Saudi Arabia
N - Nasi Goreng - Indonesia
O - Oladushki - Russia
P - Pandesal - The Philippines

Check out what other Mega Blogging Marathoners have made for Day 17:

     


   


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Friday, 20 April 2018

Pandesal

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018
#87 BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS  - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 16

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   As we're fast approaching towards the end, a few of my recipes are not ready and am fighting for time to make them. I had an idea what I wanted to make but some got left undone as I went away on a family holiday. Now with daily routine, water issues, inviting guests over for dinners and tomorrow have to make idli sambhar for my Lions Club dinner (nearly 20 people), I'm yet to make my breakfast dish with Q.  The only way I can see myself making that tomorrow in between steaming idlis and simmering sambhar is perhaps serve it to hubby for lunch. He somehow enjoys his porridge with fresh fruits and nuts from Monday to Saturday and Sunday has to be a cereal day. He can eat the same food every single day. Me on the other hand, I want variety. 

   Anyway, lets get talking about today's breakfast and worry about Q tomorrow. Today is it P for Pandesal from the PHILIPPINES. Pandesal literally means bread of salt. These rolls are typically served with coffee and accompanied with butter, cheese, jam or peanut butter. These rolls are a Spanish version of the French baguette. The Philippines was once a Spanish colony.

   Though the name is pandesal, bread of salt, it actually tastes sweeter. The rolls are soft and because they are coated with bread crumbs before baking, the crust is crispy when warm. Next day the rolls tend to become soft but when toasted taste heavenly.  These rolls reminded me of the pav rolls. Soft and buttery. 

  Since I started preparing the breakfast dishes butter and jam consumption has gone up. So for these rolls the jam had to stay in the fridge. Instead we enjoyed these rolls with some cheese. Next day hubby enjoyed the rolls with soup and I dunked mine in proper milky coffee. 






PANDESAL
Makes 12

3 cups plain flour(all purpose flour)
¾ cup warm milk
2 tsp dry active yeast 
1¼ tsp salt
¼ cup sugar
3 tbsp butter, at room temperature
1 egg, lightly beaten
½ cup bread crumbs

extra flour for dusting
extra butter for greasing

  1. If you're not using instant active dry yeast then you need to let it ferment for a while. Take some warm milk, add about 1 tsp sugar from the measured sugar. Mix well. Sprinkle the yeast over it. Cover and let it sit for 10 minutes till the mixture is frothy.
  2. Mix salt and sugar into the flour.
  3. Add the yeast mixture, the remaining milk, egg and butter.
  4. Mix the dough with a spatula or wooden spoon. Let it rest for 10-15 minutes.
  5. Sprinkle little flour on the worktop.
  6. Tip the dough onto the worktop and knead till you get a smooth and silky dough. The dough may be sticky but don't be tempted to add too much flour. Instead grease your hand with some butter.
  7. Shape the dough into a ball and return it to a greased bowl.
  8. Cover with a damp tea towel or cling film and let it rise till its double in size. Mine took  about 1 hour.
  9. Dust the worktop lightly with flour. Take the dough out of the bowl onto the worktop.
  10. Deflate it gently and divide it into 2.
  11. Roll each dough part into a log about 6" long. Roll both the logs in breadcrumbs.
  12. Slice the logs diagonally, about 1" thick. 
  13. Roll each piece again in breadcrumb and place it on a lined baking tray.
  14. At this point you can place the pandesal close to each other to make pull apart rolls or place them about an inch apart to make individual rolls.
  15. Let the rolls rise till they are double in size, about 45-50 minutes.
  16. Preheat the oven to 180°C.
  17. Bake the pandesal for 15 minutes or till the tops are golden brown.
  18. Remove the rolls from the oven. Let them cool down a bit on a wire rack.
  19. Serve warm pandesal with coffee, butter, jam, peanut butter or cheese. 
Tips:
  • Place the shaped rolls apart for individual rolls or close together to make a pull apart bread.
  • As you don't want chewy buns its best to use plain flour and not bread flour.
  • Don't be tempted to add more flour as the rolls may turn out dense.

A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia
M - Masoub - Saudi Arabia
N - Nasi Goreng - Indonesia
O - Oladushki - Russia

Check out what other Mega Blogging Marathoners have made for Day 16:

     
   


Sending this recipe to the following event:

Tuesday, 24 April 2018

Tomato Omelette

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON -APRIL 2018

#87TH BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 20

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   Do any of you have days when you just can't get any good ideas for food styling? Do you look at the photos after a few days and think 'what sort of picture have I taken?' Or sometimes are you so pressed for time that you take pictures in a hurry and then later on realize they are so bad but now the food has gone down everyones tummy? That recently happened to me and now when I look at the picture, its so so bad. I have two options, either just use that picture or make the dish again and take a better picture before its time to post the recipe. 
   
   Anyway, I think we all have our days. In this competitive world we have to compete with excellent styled food pictures against good recipes. There have been times when I've tried out a recipe from other sites and blogs and they have been disasters but the pictures are what we all call drool worthy! 
Oh well, styling food is part practice and part artistic talent. Food styling comes so easily to my daughter. Her other pictures too are good. She has an eye for it. 

Check out her website : Dubae

   We're already into Day 20 and today's breakfast is a Tomato Omelette from ARMENIA. This is not the usual omelette where one adds chopped tomatoes to the egg. Its different and tastes good and is a hearty meal. Sometimes along with the tomatoes some minced meat is added. Its easy to make and I added my own homemade tomato sauce and coriander to it as I didn't have fresh basil. This preparation is a bit like shakshuka but the difference is that instead of adding whole egg to the stir fried vegetables, here the eggs are first whisked and then added.







TOMATO OMELETTE 
Serves 2

1 onion, diced or sliced
1-2  tomatoes, diced
½ cup homemade thick tomato sauce
3-4 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
½ cup sweet bell pepper, diced
4 eggs
½ - ¾ tsp salt
1tsp pepper powder
2 tbsp fresh coriander, chopped
1 tbsp olive oil
  1. Heat oil in a wide pan over medium heat.
  2. Add chopped onion and stir fry till a bit soft.
  3. Add the chopped garlic, tomatoes and sweet bell pepper.
  4. Stri fry till the peppers are soft.
  5. Add salt and the homemade tomato sauce.
  6. Cook the mixture till all the water from the sauce evaporates.
  7. In the meantime whisk the eggs in a jug.
  8. Pour the whisked eggs over the tomato sauce.
  9. Cover the pan with a lid and let the egg cook till done.
  10. Sprinkle pepper powder and chopped coriander over the omelette.
  11. Serve with bread and butter.
Tips:
  • To make homemade tomato sauce or puree, dip the tomatoes in hot water. Leave for a few minutes. Peel off the skin. Puree the tomatoes. At this point you can leave it as it is or make it into a pizza like sauce with onions, garlic and seasoning.
  • For a firm omelette cook for a long time and for a soft omelette, cook for less time.

A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia
M - Masoub - Saudi Arabia
N - Nasi Goreng - Indonesia
O - Oladushki - Russia
P - Pandesal - The Philippines
Q - Qistibi - Tatarstan and Bashkortostan
R - Red Rice Porridge - Bhutan
S - Suafa'i - Samoa

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Monday, 23 April 2018

Suafa'i - Banana Soup

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018

#87 BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME:EXPLORE THE FLAVORS - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 19

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   When Srivalli first suggested the themes for this Mega Blogging Marathon my mind was set on the breakfast theme. Little did I know that I would truly be exploring flavors from other countries and some from countries I'd not heard of like Tatarstan. At that time the only breakfast dishes that I could see were French Toast, different bakes, oatmeals, you know the usual Sunday brunch items.  When I decided to take on the challenge of making breakfast dishes from A-Z, that's when a whole world of different breakfast dishes opened up.

   Today's breakfast is one such dish. Never heard of it before I started the research. Though it didn't seem too appetizing to boil a ripe banana in water, I still had to try it. Isn't that what the theme is all about exploring flavors that we're not use to or haven't had before? I must say after I prepared this particular breakfast dish I was surprised how tasty it was. Did I mention healthy too? Yes healthy and filling and a very different kind of breakfast.

   Breakfast with letter S is Suafa'i from SAMOA. Staple products in Samoa are coconut, banana and cocoa. So its not surprising that they have a fruit soup which is commonly served for breakfast. Suafa'i is a banana soup and supoesi is a papaya soup. I initially wanted to make the papaya soup but didn't get a nice sweet papaya. 

   Here's the recipe for Suafa'i which is commonly served for breakfast in Samoa and can also be enjoyed as a dessert. 






SUAFA'I- BANANA FRUIT SOUP 
Serves 2

2 ripe bananas
1 cup water
2-3 tbsp tapioca pearls (sabudana)
¼ - ⅓ cup coconut milk
1-2 tsp sugar -optional


  1. Soak the tapioca pearls in water for 30 minutes.
  2. Slice the bananas and add to a pan. Add the water.
  3. Put the pan on medium heat.
  4. Let the banana cook in the water till it becomes soft.
  5. Mash the cooked banana lightly with a masher or a fork.
  6. Add the tapioca pearls and let the mixture simmer till the tapioca pearls are cooked. They should become transparent. Remember to stir the mixture occasionally so that the tapioca pearls do not stick to the bottom of the pan.
  7. When the tapioca is done, add coconut milk. 
  8. Let the mixture become hot and serve immediately.
  9. This soup can also be served cold. 
Tips:
  • The recipe I followed does not recommend soaking the tapioca pearls but I did as they cook much faster.
  • Adding sugar is optional. The bananas were sweet enough so I didn't add any.
  • Use extra ripe bananas as thy tend to be sweet.You wouldn't need to add sugar.
  • The recipe for papaya soup is similar. You add 1 cup of chopped papaya and make it just the way you make saufa'i.
  • Personally I prefer the cold version. The taste is like sabudana kheer but with mashed banana in it.

A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia
M - Masoub - Saudi Arabia
N - Nasi Goreng - Indonesia
O - Oladushki - Russia
P - Pandesal - The Philippines
Q - Qistibi - Tatarstan and Bashkortostan
R - Red Rice Porridge - Bhutan

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Chilled Cucumber and Yogurt Soup

Where are the RAINS?

   Today my brain is all foggy and I can barely keep my eyes open. Last night was an uncomfortable hot night. The AC was on but I still felt hot. Its probably around 4a.m. that I fell asleep and got up at 8  a.m.! That meant it was like a mad rush getting lunch ready, getting the washing machine started and all the usual chores before 10a.m. when the water disappears from the taps. I didn't manage to beat the clock, some chores are left and will have to tackle them after 4 when the water returns. 

   Many parts of Kenya have rainfall to the extend that floods are closing down roads, bridges and some places are impossible to get to. However, Mombasa is a different story altogether. Its still hot and whenever it does drizzle the weather becomes more humid and hot. Considering that on hot days I just don't want to have curries, dals and rotis, I decided to make something cold for our FoodieMonday/Bloghop Monday theme. #141 theme is YogurtBased suggested by Amrita who blogs at The Food Samaritan. Check out Amrita's blog for beautiful clicks, lovely food styling and of course scrumptious food recipes.

   Cucumber and Yogurt are both very cooling and good to have during the hot season. Hubby was still hungry after sipping all the soup but I was a happy content person for an hour or so. On a serious note whether you want to consider this preparation as a savory smoothie, chilled soup or even a raita, its up to you. Whatever you call it, it was definitely a healthy and filling. 

Here's the recipe for a super cooling and tasty chilled cucumber and yogurt soup.





CHILLED CUCUMBER AND YOGURT SOUP
For 2

1 English cucumber (approx. 250g)
1 green chili
1 clove of garlic, peeled
1 cup plain greek yogurt
½ cup mint and coriander mixed
¼ cup sour cream
¼ cup chopped spring onion with both green and white part
½ tsp salt
1-2 tbsp lemon juice
¼ tsp pepper powder

To serve:
finely chopped cucumber
a drizzle of olive oil


  1. Cut a quarter piece from the cucumber and leave it on the side. Cut the rest into chunks.
  2. Chop the coriander, mint, chili and garlic.
  3. Put it all in a blender including the cucumber chunks along with salt, lemon juice, sour cream and pepper powder.
  4. Process the mixture to a smooth consistency.
  5. Put it in the fridge for 1-2 hours to chill.
  6. Chop the quarter piece of cucumber into very fine pieces.
  7. To serve, spoon the chilled soup in a bowl or tall glasses.
  8. Add the chopped cucumber on top and drizzle some olive oil over it.
  9. Serve chilled.
Tips:
  • Adjust the spices according to your taste.
  • Instead of sour cream can add some normal whipping cream. In that case increase the amount of lemon juice used.
You may want to check out other yogurt recipes:
strawberry frozen yogurt
Fruit and Nut Yogurt Parfait
Dahi Chura
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Sunday, 22 April 2018

Red Rice Porridge

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018

#87 BLOGGING MARATHON 

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 18

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   Meeting old classmates after many many years can be either exciting and you just pick up where you left or it can be a disheartening experience. I've met a few of my classmates after a long time. With a couple after catching up with what's transpired from the time we left school to the present, we remain friends but not best friends. With a few I've just chosen to not keep in touch as our opinions and lives are so different. 

   Today hubby met up with an old class mate of his after a long time. While they couldn't stop chatting away and catching up, the wives had to feel as comfortable as possible by making small talk. But what made so happy is to see how happy both were to catch up from where they left. 
Would I want to go to a class reunion? Well, yes definitely would as it would be nice to know how life has treated people you've schooled with.  What is your opinion about school or college reunions?

   Today's breakfast dish begins with R. I initially had planned the famous Roti John from Singapore/Malaysia. However, after so many egg breakfasts, I decided to make something quite different. That doesn't mean I'm over and done with eggs but for today, yes. R is for Red Rice Porridge all the way from BHUTAN. Bhutan is such a majestic and beautiful Buddhist Kingdom. Years back when hubby and I were much younger and more adventurous, we decided to got to Bhutan. Hubby had seen the scenic pictures of Bhutan in National Geographic and really wanted to visit the country. Not knowing the rules and regulations fully well, we landed up by road in the border town of Phuntsholing. We checked into a hotel and hubby went to the permit office to see if we could go further into Bhutan. Unfortunately we didn't get it and next day had to leave. Bhutan has a policy of allowing only a certain number of tourists into the country every year. Its their way pf preserving the pristine environment and controlling the 'bad' influence of the rest of the world.Maybe one day we will visit it.

  Bhutan is famous for its red rice and is the staple rice for the Bhutanese.Besides using the rice to make various dishes for lunch and dinner, they prepare a red rice porridge for breakfast. Also known as thupka(not the same as the soup), its just the right kind of hot and hearty meal you'd want, to fight off the cold mountain air. It is served either with a small pieces of meat or served on its own with some yak butter and yak cheese called chhurpi. The porridge has a lovely earthy and nutty flavor. The porridge is served along with some yak butter tea made of black tea with some butter in it.

   Make this nutty, creamy and absolutely delicious porridge for breakfast. Something different and healthy. I didn't have access to yak butter and cheese so opted to use what was locally available. I used feta cheese.







RED RICE PORRIDGE  
Serves 2

½ cup red rice
2-3 cups of water, depending on the type of red rice used
¼ tsp salt
½ tsp ginger paste or cut into thin slivers
5-6 Sichuan peppercorns, ground into a coarse powder
2 tsp butter
2 tbsp soft cheese like feta or ricotta (instead of soft yak cheese)


  1. Wash the rice in a sieve for a few seconds.
  2. Add it to a pan along with the water, ginger and salt.
  3. Cover the pan and cook the rice over medium heat till it is soft and cooked. The rice will turn from red to a pink colour.
  4. If necessary add some more water.
  5. Puree the rice a bit(not into a smooth consistency). It should be coarse.
  6. Add pepper and mix well.
  7. Spoon the porridge into serving bowls.
  8. Top it with some butter and soft cheese.
  9. Serve it piping hot with some yak butter tea.
Tips:
  • I soaked the rice in water for 30 minutes so that it would cook faster.
  • If you don't have Sichuan peppercorns, using normal black peppercorns.
  • Adding small pieces of cooked meat is an option.
  • I found the above recipe was enough for hubby and me as the preparation is filling. However, you can increase the amount of rice to make more porridge.

A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia
M - Masoub - Saudi Arabia
N - Nasi Goreng - Indonesia
O - Oladushki - Russia
P - Pandesal - The Philippines
Q - Qistibi - Tatarstan and Bashkortostan

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Saturday, 21 April 2018

Qistibi

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018
#87 BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS  - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 17

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   If you've read my yesterday's post, I had mentioned that I have to make idli sambhar for my Lions Club meeting. All went well, everyone enjoyed it. However, last night when I was grinding the rice and dal to make the batter, my blender jug broke. Literally the bottom bit crumbled into pieces, thanks to the salty water we get in our taps that over time the metal parts got rusted. I shouted to my hubby to get ready immediately so that we can make it to the only supermarket in town before it closes. 

   Hubby tried to reason with me that in my urgency to get another blender, I'll pick whatever I see first and then later regret the buy. I told him that he does not understand. He tried to convince me that he understood my predicament. Then he suggested I borrow my neighbor's blender. At first I didn't thinking what if it gets spoilt. Ever resourceful hubby said that if that happens then we'll buy two! Finally borrowed the blender from my neighbor. Tomorrow going to hunt for a good food processor.

   What would life be without neighbors? They're usually the first ones who come to your aid. During our visits to Montreal, as much as I love the parks, the weather, the cleanliness, the availability of quality goods, I tell my hubby that I miss chitchatting to my neighbors. In all these years that we've been visiting my son, we don't even know the neighbors. Its just too quiet for me. I get a chance to talk tony immediate neighbor every day. If she doesn't see me and I haven't mentioned to her that I'll be going out, she will immediately call to find out if I'm ok. 

   Day 17 the breakfast (which I served hubby for lunch) turned out to a pleasant surprise for both of us. We both love mashed potatoes and these flatbreads were perfect as lunch with a large serving of salad. I made Qistibi which is famous in Tatarstan and Bashkortostan(also known as Bashkiria) both are federal subjects (republic) of the Russian Federation. Frankly I've not heard of these republics. But hey as food bloggers not only do we learn about food and different cuisine but also about different parts of the world. While doing my research for breakfast around the world, I was looking for breads that are a part of breakfast and stumbled upon Qistibi. The name itself caught my attention. What a unique name. I did a happy dance that I've found something beginning with Q, before so many of the easier letters. 

  Qistibi is popular as a breakfast dish. The stuffing can be either mashed potatoes or a millet gruel. Its usually served with tea that is extra milky and has some dried fruit in it. I didn't make the tea as it was lunch time, but served qistibi with some sour cream. Rolling the flatbread really thin was a bit of a challenge but worth every effort. While I was making qistibi, thought hubby will say that its just a fancy name for aloo paratha. However, it tastes so different from aloo paratha as the mashed potatoes are nice and creamy and hardly any spices are used.


Check out the recipe for Qistibi and do Google Tatarstan and Bashkortostan. They both look so beautiful. It's on my the bucket list ;)















QISTIBI

Makes 6
Recipe Source: The Bread Guru

For the flatbread:
1 cup plain flour
1 tbsp butter, at room temperature
¼ tsp salt
a generous pinch of soda bicarbonate (baking soda)
¼ tsp sugar
2 tbsp plain yogurt
4 tbsp milk

For the mashed potatoes:

2 medium potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks
½ tsp salt
2-3 tbsp milk
1-2 tbsp butter
1 small onion, finely chopped
½ tsp pepper powder

extra butter or oil for frying

extra flour for dusting

Preparation of the flatbread:

  1. Mix flour, salt, sugar and baking soda in a bowl.
  2. Rub the butter into the flour.
  3. Mix yogurt and milk. Add to the flour and make a dough.
  4. Take a little butter or oil in your hands and knead the dough till it becomes smooth.
  5. Cover the dough and let it rest for 20-30 minutes.
  6. Divide the dough into 6 parts. Shape them into balls.
  7. Roll each part into a flat thin circle, like a tortilla or roti but much thinner. The diameter of the rolled circle should be about 7"- 8".
  8. Cover the rolled flatbread with a tea towel so it doesn't dry out.
  9. When you've rolled all the divided dough, heat a pan over medium heat.
  10. Place the flatbread on the hot pan and cook it till bubbles appear. 
  11. Flip it over and cook for a few seconds.
  12. Remove from the pan and cover it with a tea towel.
  13. Repeat steps 10-12 with the remaining flatbreads.
Preparation of the mashed potatoes:
  1. Add the cubed potatoes in a pan with just enough water to cover the potatoes.
  2. Cover the pan and let the potato pieces boil till done.
  3. Remove the water (save it to add to soup or use it to make dough for roti or naan).
  4. While the potatoes are still a bit hot, mash them completely.
  5. Add salt, pepper, milk and butter and mix well.
  6. Heat 1 tbsp oil or butter and stir fry the chopped onions till done.
  7. Add the fried onion to the mashed potato mixture and mix well.
Preparation of Qistibi:
  1. Heat the pan again over medium heat.
  2. Divide the mashed potato mixture into 6 parts.
  3. Take one part of the mashed potato and spread it out on the flatbread to make a thin layer.
  4. Fold the flatbread into half, just like a quesadilla.
  5. Place it on the hot pan. Brush some butter on the upper side of the qistibi.
  6. Flip it over and let it cook till brown specks appear.
  7. Brush some butter on the upper side and flip. Let it cook till its light golden in color or brown specks appear.
  8. Repeat steps 3-7 with the remaining flatbread and mashed potato.
  9. Serve qistibi with some dried fruit tea. 
Tips:
  • As I made a small quantity I avoided adding egg and used yogurt instead. If you double the recipe then you can add one medium egg to the dough. You may need less milk. However, even though I didn't add the egg, the flatbread turned out soft and a little crispy.
  • To make dried fruit tea, usually equal parts of water and milk are boiled with some dried fruit of your choice. 
  • Use extra flour for dusting to help you to roll out the flatbread thin.

A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia
M - Masoub - Saudi Arabia
N - Nasi Goreng - Indonesia
O - Oladushki - Russia
P - Pandesal - The Philippines

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Friday, 20 April 2018

Pandesal

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018
#87 BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS  - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 16

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   As we're fast approaching towards the end, a few of my recipes are not ready and am fighting for time to make them. I had an idea what I wanted to make but some got left undone as I went away on a family holiday. Now with daily routine, water issues, inviting guests over for dinners and tomorrow have to make idli sambhar for my Lions Club dinner (nearly 20 people), I'm yet to make my breakfast dish with Q.  The only way I can see myself making that tomorrow in between steaming idlis and simmering sambhar is perhaps serve it to hubby for lunch. He somehow enjoys his porridge with fresh fruits and nuts from Monday to Saturday and Sunday has to be a cereal day. He can eat the same food every single day. Me on the other hand, I want variety. 

   Anyway, lets get talking about today's breakfast and worry about Q tomorrow. Today is it P for Pandesal from the PHILIPPINES. Pandesal literally means bread of salt. These rolls are typically served with coffee and accompanied with butter, cheese, jam or peanut butter. These rolls are a Spanish version of the French baguette. The Philippines was once a Spanish colony.

   Though the name is pandesal, bread of salt, it actually tastes sweeter. The rolls are soft and because they are coated with bread crumbs before baking, the crust is crispy when warm. Next day the rolls tend to become soft but when toasted taste heavenly.  These rolls reminded me of the pav rolls. Soft and buttery. 

  Since I started preparing the breakfast dishes butter and jam consumption has gone up. So for these rolls the jam had to stay in the fridge. Instead we enjoyed these rolls with some cheese. Next day hubby enjoyed the rolls with soup and I dunked mine in proper milky coffee. 






PANDESAL
Makes 12

3 cups plain flour(all purpose flour)
¾ cup warm milk
2 tsp dry active yeast 
1¼ tsp salt
¼ cup sugar
3 tbsp butter, at room temperature
1 egg, lightly beaten
½ cup bread crumbs

extra flour for dusting
extra butter for greasing

  1. If you're not using instant active dry yeast then you need to let it ferment for a while. Take some warm milk, add about 1 tsp sugar from the measured sugar. Mix well. Sprinkle the yeast over it. Cover and let it sit for 10 minutes till the mixture is frothy.
  2. Mix salt and sugar into the flour.
  3. Add the yeast mixture, the remaining milk, egg and butter.
  4. Mix the dough with a spatula or wooden spoon. Let it rest for 10-15 minutes.
  5. Sprinkle little flour on the worktop.
  6. Tip the dough onto the worktop and knead till you get a smooth and silky dough. The dough may be sticky but don't be tempted to add too much flour. Instead grease your hand with some butter.
  7. Shape the dough into a ball and return it to a greased bowl.
  8. Cover with a damp tea towel or cling film and let it rise till its double in size. Mine took  about 1 hour.
  9. Dust the worktop lightly with flour. Take the dough out of the bowl onto the worktop.
  10. Deflate it gently and divide it into 2.
  11. Roll each dough part into a log about 6" long. Roll both the logs in breadcrumbs.
  12. Slice the logs diagonally, about 1" thick. 
  13. Roll each piece again in breadcrumb and place it on a lined baking tray.
  14. At this point you can place the pandesal close to each other to make pull apart rolls or place them about an inch apart to make individual rolls.
  15. Let the rolls rise till they are double in size, about 45-50 minutes.
  16. Preheat the oven to 180°C.
  17. Bake the pandesal for 15 minutes or till the tops are golden brown.
  18. Remove the rolls from the oven. Let them cool down a bit on a wire rack.
  19. Serve warm pandesal with coffee, butter, jam, peanut butter or cheese. 
Tips:
  • Place the shaped rolls apart for individual rolls or close together to make a pull apart bread.
  • As you don't want chewy buns its best to use plain flour and not bread flour.
  • Don't be tempted to add more flour as the rolls may turn out dense.

A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia
M - Masoub - Saudi Arabia
N - Nasi Goreng - Indonesia
O - Oladushki - Russia

Check out what other Mega Blogging Marathoners have made for Day 16:

     
   


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